Arts

Author Interviews
7:43 am
Sat September 29, 2012

Online And In The Open: Transparent Novel Writing

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 3:17 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Writing's often depicted as a private act - scribbling, crossing out, then crumpling two sheets into a fireplace; trial, error and angst - all of which is best kept private. Silvia Hartmann is now writing on a kind of electronic stage - in an open document, a Google doc - so that readers can see her story appear line by line, edit by edit. Silvia Hartmann joins us from the south coast of England. Thanks so much for being with us.

SILVIA HARTMANN: Hi.

SIMON: So what are you trying to do here, write a novel?

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Deceptive Cadence
6:14 am
Sat September 29, 2012

Leonard Bernstein's 'Kaddish' Symphony: A Crisis Of Faith

The traditional Jewish Kaddish prayer gets turned on its head in Leonard Bernstein's Symphony No. 3.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 3:46 pm

I can't think of anything I loved more than talking to Leonard Bernstein. Or, more accurately, listening to him talk — about music or any topic under the sun. I remember a long discourse we had about one of my favorite books, Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain, and Bernstein's summarizing statement: "Well, of course, every author spends his whole life writing the same book."

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Author Interviews
6:11 am
Sat September 29, 2012

'Listening In' To JFK's Secret White House Recordings

Listening In, a new book and CD set, includes more than 260 hours of transcribed conversations and 2.5 hours of audio from inside the Kennedy White House.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 7:41 pm

In the spring of 1963, as the U.S. was mired in conflicts with Vietnam and Cuba and the Soviet Union, President John F. Kennedy called his old friend David Hackett to express his frustration at the U.S. men's ice hockey team — and their miserable record overseas.

JFK: Dave, I noticed that in the paper this morning that the Swedish team beat the American hockey team 17-2.
Hackett: Yeah, I saw that.
JFK: Christ! Who are we sending over there? Girls?

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NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse
4:50 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

NewsPoet: Philip Schultz Writes The Day In Verse

Philip Schultz visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Monday.
Ryan Smith NPR

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 7:24 pm

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:08 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Gustavo Dudamel On The Magic Of Stravinsky's 'Crazy Music'

Conductor Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
Courtesy of the Los Angeles Philharmonic

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 3:46 pm

This Sunday, a landmark composition of the 20th century will be webcast by NPR, and led by the quintessential 21st century conductor: 31-year-old Gustavo Dudamel, who will conduct the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring). Dudamel spoke about his experience of this earthshaking piece with All Things Considered host Robert Siegel.

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Classics in Concert
12:47 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Carnegie Hall Live: Chicago Symphony Orchestra Performs 'Carmina Burana'

Riccardo Muti so impressed composer Carl Orff with his 1980 'Carmina Burana' performance that Orff reworked some tempo and dynamic markings in the score to hew to Muti's interpretation.
Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 7:52 am

Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

  • Riccardo Muti, music director and conductor
  • Rosa Feola, soprano
  • Antonio Giovannini, countertenor
  • Audun Iversen, baritone
  • Chicago Symphony Chorus (Duain Wolfe, chorus director)
  • Chicago Children's Choir (Josephine Lee, artistic director)

It is one of classical music's most resilient creatures, repeatedly set loose across concert halls, recording studios and the landscape of popular entertainment.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:05 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

The Academy Of St. Martin In The Red

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Deceptive Cadence
11:37 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Orchestra Strikes, The Winter Of 'Spring For Music' And A Fertile Face For Opera

Riccardo Muti leading the Chicago Symphony in happier times.
Todd Rosenberg courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
  • The biggest news of the week was the walkout at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, which forced the cancellation of the first Saturday night concert of the 2012-13 season. Management and the players wrestled over players' health care contributions. How does their compensation stack up, you may ask? "The current average salary of CSO musicians, who have a base salary of $145,000, is $173,000.
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Live in Concert
11:15 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Efterklang With Wordless Music Orchestra, Live In Concert

Efterklang performs with Wordless Music Orchestra at the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Ryan Muir for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 1:00 pm

The Danish art-rock trio Efterklang took the stage with the Wordless Music Orchestra at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Thursday for this, the American premiere of music from the band's album Piramida.

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Books
10:54 am
Fri September 28, 2012

This Week's 5 Must-Read Stories From NPR Books

Guiseppe Cacace AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:42 am

1. Foodie Fervor

If there's one thing that trumps a great read for me, it's a great meal.

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Paperback Fiction Bestsellers
9:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of September 27, 2012

Tea Obreht's Balkan adventure tale, The Tiger's Wife, is on the list for a 47th week.

Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
9:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of September 27, 2012

Ken Follett continues his epic, 20th century series with Winter of the World. It debuts at No. 1.

NPR Bestseller List
9:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of September 27, 2012

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
9:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of September 27, 2012

At No. 9, Robert K. Massie's Catherine The Great reconstructs the life of an 18th-century empress.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
9:03 am
Fri September 28, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of September 27, 2012

In Joseph Anton, Salman Rushdie reflects on how he survived a deadly fatwa. It debuts at No. 2.

Books
4:49 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Rowling Draws On Personal Experience In 'Vacancy'

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 8:29 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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Books
3:30 am
Fri September 28, 2012

Put Down Your E-Reader: This Book's Better In Print

"For two days and nights, Odysseus was alone in the wild water. The sea was so rough that he couldn't see beyond the nearest wave. Over and over again, he thought he was going to die."
Neil Packer Candlewick Press

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 11:28 am

Most people who read a lot have gotten used to reading on a screen, whether it's a laptop, a tablet or an e-reader. Some say they prefer it to the experience of reading a heavy, awkward print version of the book. But every now and then, a book comes along that just seems to insist on being physical — something about it simply can't be transferred to the screen.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:34 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Klaus Heymann: On 25 Years Of Naxos — And Changing The Classical Music Business

Naxos founder Klaus Heymann.
Lam King Yin Courtesy of Naxos

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:07 pm

Twenty-five years ago, no one — and I mean no one — would have predicted that a little budget label out of Hong Kong would totally upend the classical music industry. But after doing everything pretty much counter to received wisdom, the Naxos catalog includes more than 7,000 recordings, and they've sold more than 115 million CDs worldwide. A very popular streaming service, the Naxos Music Library, contains nearly a million tracks.

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Arts
2:56 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

SU Gets a Taste of “Staying Human”

Review by Simone Brown

Jonathan Batiste & The Stay Human Band brought the spirit and the music of New Orleans to Salisbury University’s Holloway Hall Monday.  The band gave a two hour performance, which concluded a funky, jazzy dance progression down aisles.

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Author Interviews
2:07 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

British Scientist Driven To Find 'Spark Of Life'

W. W. Norton & Company

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 3:47 pm

One night in 1984, British scientist Frances Ashcroft was studying electricity in the body and discovered the protein that causes neonatal diabetes. She says she felt so "over the moon" that she couldn't sleep.

By the next morning, she says, she thought it was a mistake.

But luckily, that feeling was wrong, and Ashcroft's revelation led to a medical breakthrough decades later, which now enables people born with diabetes to take pills instead of injecting insulin.

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Monkey See
12:47 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Women, Men And Fiction: Notes On How Not To Answer Hard Questions

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 1:32 pm

Nothing is more vexing than a question where 10 percent of the public discussion is spent trying to answer it and 90 percent is spent arguing about whether it matters.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:45 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

The 2012 Gramophone Awards: Some Surprises, Lots Of (Repeated) Familiar Names

Tenor Joseph Calleja, the 2012 Gramophone Artist of the Year.
Mathias Bothor courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:07 pm

In terms of international prestige, it's hard to think of bigger prizes in the classical community than those given annually by the British classical music magazine Gramophone (where I served as the North America editor for several years). Sure, the Grammys have more general name recognition, but these Eurocentric awards, completely dedicated to classical music, offer far more depth and breadth than their nearest American counterparts, both in terms of artists and repertoire.

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Sports
12:03 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Eric LeGrand Tackling Life's Obstacles

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 1:54 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we're talking with Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas. We'll ask the flying squirrel how it feels in that white hot spotlight and what kind of sacrifices she made to get there.

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Arts
11:30 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Violist Roberto Díaz

Internationally esteemed Viola virtuoso Roberto Diaz, and current Director of the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music performs in recital on Sept. 29th, 2012.   Kara Dahl Russell talks to him about the mystique of the Viola, the repertoire for the instrument, his upcoming performance and recordings, and whether “classical” music can hope for a more melodic future.

Click here for more information about the Sept. 29 recital.

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu September 27, 2012

'May We Be Forgiven' Blames The Online World

Courtesy of Viking Penguin

"I am guilty," admits Harold Silver, the protagonist of A.M. Homes' new novel, May We Be Forgiven. "I am guilty of even more than I realized I could be guilty of."

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Book Reviews
4:32 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

A Midcentury Romance, With 'Sunlight' And 'Shadow'

John Craven Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 5:54 pm

New York, New York, it's a wonderful town! And Mark Helprin's new near-epic novel makes it all the more marvelous. It's got great polarized motifs — war and peace, heroism and cowardice, crime and civility, pleasure and business, love and hate, bias and acceptance — which the gifted novelist weaves into a grand, old-fashioned romance, a New York love story that begins with a Hollywoodish meet-cute on the Staten Island Ferry.

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Books
2:45 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Poverty Informs J.K. Rowling's New Novel For Adults

Author J.K. Rowling arrives at the world premiere of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, in Leicester Square in central London.
Matt Crossick PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 12:00 pm

  • Listen to Part One of the Interview
  • Hear the Extended Interview

The extended interview above includes parts one and two of the Morning Edition interview, plus additional material.


J.K. Rowling has a new novel. She's moved away from Harry Potter, the boy wizard whose stories prompted millions of kids to obsess over books big enough to serve as doorstops. Having concluded that series, she's written a novel for grown-ups called The Casual Vacancy, a story of troubled teenagers and their even more troubled parents.

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Author Interviews
2:32 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

'Sutton': America's 1920s, Bank-Robbing 'Robin Hood'

Hyperion

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 2:49 pm

After the global financial crisis hit in 2008, Pulitzer Prize winner J.R. Moehringer was so angry at banks, he says, he decided to write about the people who rob them — in the form of fiction, since he's not an economist.

"I thought it would be healthy to live vicariously through a bank robber at that moment that bankers were ruining the world," Moehringer tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

In his first historical novel, Sutton, Moehringer writes from the point of view of Willie Sutton, whom he calls the "greatest American bank robber."

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Deceptive Cadence
9:27 am
Wed September 26, 2012

A Young Pianist Triumphs In Music From The Young 20th Century

Another solid album from Polish pianist Rafał Blechacz shows he's an artist of distinction.
Felix Broede DG

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 1:08 pm

Polish pianist Rafał Blechacz was just 20 years old when he swept all five top prizes at the 2005 Chopin Competition in Warsaw. His domination was so thorough the judges declined to award a runner-up.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Pratchett Leaves Discworld For London In 'Dodger'

HarperCollins

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 8:20 am

In 2011, NPR's Morning Edition interviewed fantasy author Terry Pratchett about becoming a legalized-suicide advocate in his native England, after his diagnosis with early-onset Alzheimer's.

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