Arts

Deceptive Cadence
11:53 am
Fri February 15, 2013

Jailhouse Bach

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:08 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Measures Of Affection: Five Musical Love Letters

Composer Peter Lieberson wrote his Neruda Songs for his wife, mezzo-soprano Lorraine Hunt Lieberson.
Johansen Krause Peter Lieberson

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 12:21 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
3:17 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Subterranean Notes, The New Baroque And A Nod To Minnesota: Music We Love Now

Violist Nadia Sirota.
Samantha West courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 13, 2013 11:52 am

From Christopher Purves' bottomless bass voice and the soaring Sibelius Fifth to a violist's new take on the Baroque, it's this week's list of albums we can't stop listening to. Got a favorite album you've had on repeat lately? Let us know about it the comments section.

Deceptive Cadence
12:23 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Classical Grammys 2013: Same Old Winners, Bold New Music

Members of eighth blackbird performing at the pre-telecast Grammy Awards Sunday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Ah, the joys of Monday morning quarterbacking, classical style.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:59 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Remembering Pioneering American Conductor, Poet And Anime Inspiration James DePreist

The late American conductor James DePreist.
Wendy Leher courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 2:31 pm

Pioneering American conductor, National Medal of Arts winner and poet James DePreist died early this morning in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 76 years old. His death, his manager told Deceptive Cadence, stemmed from complications following a heart attack he suffered nearly a year ago.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri February 8, 2013

Psy Opera

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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Arts
3:36 pm
Thu February 7, 2013

Dr. William Folger, Dean of SU's Music Dept.

This Friday, Feb. 8th  at S.U., the Faculty of the Music Department will present a recital in conjunction with the opening reception of an Art Dept. Faculty show.  Kara Dahl Russell talks with the Dean of the Music Department, Dr. William Folger about this, and other upcoming departmental collaborations on the S.U. campus.


SU Faculty Art Show Feb 8th

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Classics in Concert
11:53 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Max Richter In Concert: Reimagining Vivaldi

Composer-performer Max Richter (right) brings his revamped Vivaldi to Manhattan's Le Poisson Rouge.
Denise DeBelius NPR

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 3:00 pm

Can't take another moment of Vivaldi's ubiquitous Four Seasons? Neither could Max Richter, a London-based composer who deftly blurs the lines between the classical and electronic worlds.

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Classical Sessions
1:35 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Pianist Daniil Trifonov: Disappearing Into Chopin

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 3:52 pm

The 21-year-old pianist Daniil Trifonov has been living through the kind of career trajectory that's often called "meteoric." Within one concert season he won gold medals at both the Tchaikovsky and Artur Rubinstein competitions, and a third prize at the Chopin competition.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:41 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

Lean But Seen: The Joy Of Smaller Opera

Composer Mohammed Fairouz, whose hour-long chamber opera Sumeida's Song recently appeared on recording and on stage.
Samantha West courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 9:50 am

When a new festival for opera and musical theater called "Prototype" opened in New York last month, it wasn't inaugurated with a huge new piece. Instead, the festival was kicked off with the first staging of Mohammed Fairouz' opera Sumeida's Song — a work for four singers and a handful of musicians that lasts just 60 minutes long, presented at Here, a theater in Manhattan's Tribeca that seats just 100 people.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:25 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Does Classical Music Have A Transgender Problem?

Pianist Sara Davis Buechner.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 3:43 pm

Yesterday, pianist Sara Davis Buechner published on the New York Times website a brave and moving account of her experiences as a transgendered person. "As David Buechner, born in the northwest suburbs of Baltimore in 1959," she writes, "I became an internationally known concert pianist. But from the time I was a child, I understood that I was meant to be Sara."

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Tiny Desk Concerts
2:33 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Cantus: Tiny Desk Concert

Cantus performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Dec. 3, 2012.
Ryan Smith for NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 6:43 pm

Is there some kind of weird vocal vortex in Minnesota? The state turns out so many excellent choral groups — at the school, church and professional levels — that it can arguably be dubbed the choral center of the U.S.

The members of the male vocal ensemble called Cantus, who huddled around Bob Boilen's desk to sing for us, hail from that vortex — specifically Minneapolis-St. Paul.

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Afghanistan
5:21 am
Sun February 3, 2013

From A Land Where Music Was Banned — To Carnegie Hall

Afghanistan's youth orchestra performs in Kabul on Jan. 31. The orchestra is coming to the U.S. and will appear at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Shah Marai AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 3:49 pm

In Afghanistan, there was no sound of music when the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001. The Islamist militants destroyed music CDs and instruments and even jailed musicians.

Today, there are music schools and young Afghans playing in public. And, this weekend, 48 Afghan boys and girls are traveling to the U.S. to perform at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

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Live in Concert
5:37 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Carnegie Hall Live: Daniel Barenboim Leads The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Daniel Barenboim conducts the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in Beethoven's Symphony No. 2 live at Carnegie Hall on February 3, 2013.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 4:25 pm

Performers:

  • West-Eastern Divan Orchestra
  • Daniel Barenboim, music director and conductor
  • Diana Damrau, soprano
  • Kate Lindsey, mezzo-soprano
  • Piotr Beczala, tenor
  • René Pape, bass
  • Westminster Symphonic Choir
  • Joe Miller, Conductor
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Deceptive Cadence
5:34 pm
Fri February 1, 2013

Treasures In The Attic: Finding A Jazz Master's Lost Orchestral Music

Stride piano pioneer James P. Johnson had dreams of becoming a successful symphonic composer.
William Gottlieb

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 5:13 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
11:58 am
Fri February 1, 2013

I'm OK, You're Slightly Flat

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

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All Songs Considered
11:16 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Song Premiere: Jozef Van Wissem, 'Where You Lived And What You Lived For'

Jozef Van Wissem with his one-of-a-kind black lute.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 2:14 pm

When Jozef Van Wissem plays the lute, he doesn't sit. Instead, the New York-based Dutchman stands, looming over his low-hanging instrument like the "figure in black" character in "Black Sabbath" — that'd be the song "Black Sabbath," from the album Black Sabbath, by Black Sabbath — that scares the living bejeezus out of everyone.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:03 am
Fri February 1, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

  • Hugely good news for all you wandering minstrels: After years of pressure from groups like the American Federation of Musicians, the FAA has just passed a bill that (finally!) allows musicians to carry their instruments as carry-on luggage or, for larger instruments, to buy an extra seat. However, the federal agency has a year to implement the new standards.
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Deceptive Cadence
2:38 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

A Little Part Of Poulenc In All Of Us

French composer Francis Poulenc (photographed in 1960 in New York) is famous for his music and his many contradictions.
John Jonas Gruen Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:05 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
5:27 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Meet The Musical Mendelssohns: Felix And Fanny

Virgin

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 7:14 pm

Musical talent tends to run in families. Think of Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, Rufus and Martha Wainwright, Colin and Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead, or The Jackson 5.

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Arts
3:56 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Harp on This! Samples

Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat January 26, 2013

Petra Haden Covers Classic Film Scores With A Single Voice

Petra Haden's new album is titled Petra Goes to the Movies.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:36 pm

Petra Haden had a problem when she was a child: "I remember watching Looney Tunes cartoons and having the music stuck in my head," the singer and violinist says.

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Field Recordings
3:41 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

The Ebene Quartet Powers Through Mendelssohn

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 5:21 pm

The Paris-based Quatuor Ebene — the "Ebony Quartet" — has risen fast in the musical world with two separate artistic identities. In recent years, audiences have gotten to know the "other" Ebenes — the sophisticated cover band that plays everything from "Miserlou" (the Pulp Fiction theme) to jazz to "Someday My Prince Will Come" (yes, the one from Disney's Snow White).

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Music
2:42 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

New Opera Gets Benefit Of The 'Doubt'

In the operatic version of Doubt, Father Flynn (Matthew Worth) must defend his name after a suspicious Sister Aloysius (Christine Brewer) accuses him of sexually abusing an altar boy.
Michal Daniel Minnesota Opera

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 7:25 pm

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Song Travels
1:03 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

Miloš Karadaglić On 'Song Travels'

Miloš Karadaglić.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:08 pm

Classical guitarist Miloš Karadaglić first studied guitar at the age of 8 in his home country of Montenegro, formerly part of Yugoslavia. At 14, Karadaglić was invited to play at a concert hall in Paris, and he later traveled to Italy to meet classical guitarist David Russell, who advised him to enroll at the Royal Academy of Music in London.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:56 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Why Time Warner Cable Dropped Ovation

Pablo Helguera

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. His new book is Helguera's Artunes. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
9:03 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Classical Crib Sheet: Top 5 Stories This Week

Anne Akiko Meyers, holding the "Vieuxtemps" Guarneri del Gesu violin, which reportedly sold for a record price. She says the anonymous buyer has offered her use of the instrument for life.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri January 25, 2013 3:20 pm

  • Anne Akiko Meyers — the violinist who made news a year ago for an album recorded on her two Stradivarius instruments, including the then record price-breaking "Molitor" Strad, which she purchased for $3.6 million — announced yesterday that she's been given lifetime use of the 1741 "Vieuxtemps" Guarne
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Deceptive Cadence
3:11 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

Back Off The Bach To Drive Safely

A new study claims that listening to classical music makes for unsafe driving.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 12:54 pm

Researchers in London claim that listening to classical music makes for unsafe driving — in fact, that it caused more erratic driving than hip-hop, heavy metal or not listening to music at all.

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Classics in Concert
1:04 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

Reneé Fleming And Susan Graham At Carnegie Hall

Reneé Fleming (right) and Susan Graham — two "cheerful Americans" often mistaken for each other — are planning an intimate evening of French song.
Craig T. Mathew/Mathew Imaging

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 10:37 am

No one would mistake Carnegie Hall's grand 2,800-seat Isaac Stern Auditorium for a cozy Parisian salon. But soprano Reneé Fleming and mezzo-soprano Susan Graham will do their best to conjure such an intimate space Sunday at 8 p.m. ET as they present an evening of French songs, webcast live on this page and at WQXR.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:45 pm
Tue January 22, 2013

Musical Google Earth: Composer Paul Moravec's Sense of Place

The mountainside Montserrat monastery, north of Barcelona, inspired Paul Moravec to write a cello concerto.
Luis Davilla Cover/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 3:10 pm

"Location, location, location" is the mantra of real estate, but for centuries geographical locales have also been a boon to the imagination of many a composer. Think of Tchaikovsky, who mimicked the bugle calls he heard each morning while visiting Rome in the opening brass fanfare of his Capriccio Italien.

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