Weekend Edition Sunday

Sundays at 8AM

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Cornish on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
518927f1e1c8da4026d9acac|518927e7e1c8da4026d9ac88

Pages

Education
11:00 am
Sun December 29, 2013

A Campus More Colorful Than Reality: Beware That College Brochure

In an effort to show diversity, University of Wisconsin officials added the face of a black student, Diallo Shabazz, to a file photo for the cover of the school's 2000 application booklet.
AP

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 11:12 am

Diallo Shabazz was a student at the University of Wisconsin in 2000 when he stopped by the admissions office.

"One of the admissions counselors walked up to me, and said, 'Diallo, did you see yourself in the admissions booklet? Actually, you're on the cover this year,' " Shabazz says.

The photo was a shot of students at a football game — but Shabazz had never been to a football game.

"So I flipped back, and that's when I saw my head cut off and kind of pasted onto the front cover of the admissions booklet," he says.

Read more
Animals
8:59 am
Sun December 29, 2013

To Save The Black Rhino, Hunting Club Bids On Killing One

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 11:12 am

Fewer than 5,000 black rhinos are thought to exist in the wild, and in an effort to preserve the species, the Dallas Safari Club is offering a chance to kill one.

The Texas-based hunting organization is auctioning off a permit to hunt a rhinoceros in Nambia. It's a fundraiser intended to help save the larger population.

Read more
Strange News
8:37 am
Sun December 29, 2013

9-Year-Old Climbs Tallest Mountain In The Americas

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 11:12 am

Transcript

JENNIFER LUDDEN, HOST:

Sunday Puzzle
8:02 am
Sun December 29, 2013

Now You Know Them

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 29, 2013 12:16 pm

On-air challenge: You will be given some names that you probably never heard of before 2013, but that were in the news during the past 12 months. You name who the people are. These names were compiled with the help of Kathie Baker, Tim Goodman and Sandy Weisz.

Last week's challenge from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco: Think of a well-known filmmaker, first and last names. Add "S-U-N" before this person's first name and last name. In each case, you'll form a common English word. Who is the filmmaker?

Read more
Environment
2:49 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

Easter Island's Secret May Be Adaptation, Not Suicide

The Polynesian society of Easter Island supposedly collapsed in the late 1600s after the population razed the island of every last tree. Recent evidence suggests a different story, one that hints not at environmental suicide but at successful adaptation. NPR's Rachel Martin talks with anthropologist Mara Mulrooney about her research.

Politics
11:55 am
Sun December 22, 2013

Pension Cut Angers Senate's Staunchest Military Supporters

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., left, is urging her Senate colleagues to change the budget proposal that cuts retirement benefits for current and future military retirees.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 2:33 pm

In the two-year, $2 trillion budget deal that cleared the Senate last week, one item, worth just one-sixth of 1 percent of that total, was the reason many senators said they voted against it.

That item would produce some $6 billion in savings by shaving a percentage point off annual cost-of-living adjustments, and it would apply only to military pensions. Not all military pensions — just the retirement paid to veterans younger than 62.

Read more
The Sunday Conversation
11:03 am
Sun December 22, 2013

After Coming Out, Gay Mormon Finds Support At Home

Jamison Manwaring's brother Jonathan (right) and Jonathan's wife, Rachel, have become advocates for gay Mormons since Jamison came out.
Courtesy Jamison Manwaring

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 4:03 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Jamison Manwaring came out to extended family and his church community last spring in a YouTube video. More than 20,000 people have watched it since.

Coming out wasn't easy, because Manwaring is a Mormon. According to the church, having homosexual feelings is not a sin, but acting upon them is.

Read more
Africa
10:05 am
Sun December 22, 2013

CAR Atrocities Must Be Answered, Says U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power

Samantha Power greets children on Thursday at a makeshift refugee camp in Central African Republic, where more than 40,000 people have found refuge from sectarian violence.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 8:56 am

The vicious sectarian violence in the Central African Republic continued last week as Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, visited on Thursday to make an appeal for peace.

It was a particularly significant trip for the ambassador: She began her career as a journalist and an activist, and was a vocal critic of the U.S. response to past atrocities and genocides.

Read more
Around the Nation
10:05 am
Sun December 22, 2013

A Big Helping Of Christmas Compassion At Joseph's House

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 2:33 pm

Joseph's House is a hospice in Washington, D.C., for people who don't have a home. Started in 1990, it's a spot where people with end-stage AIDS and cancer can come to receive food, shelter, medication and community. NPR's Rachel Martin checks in for the holidays.

From Our Listeners
10:05 am
Sun December 22, 2013

Listeners Share Their First-Time-Ever Christmas Plans

Originally published on Sun December 22, 2013 2:33 pm

Weekend Edition asked you to share something memorable you'll be doing for the first time this Christmas. NPR's Rachel Martin shares some of your stories.

Deceptive Cadence
5:07 am
Sun December 22, 2013

Talking Great Teachers And Students With Two Piano Masters

Pianist Lang Lang sits down with his own revered mentor Gary Graffman, to discuss what makes great teachers — and bad ones.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue December 24, 2013 12:52 pm

The relationship between a teacher and a student can be transformative. It's a particularly important relationship in classical music. A teacher is part mentor, part manager — even a parental figure.

Read more
From Our Listeners
11:27 am
Sun December 15, 2013

A Diamond, A Motorcycle, A Wooden Ring: Best Gifts Ever

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
11:18 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Our Favorite TV Parties

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 11:27 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So, those are the fabulous soirees of fiction, but what about those lower-brow shindigs - the parties on our favorite TV shows that we'd love to crash? There is, of course, Elaine's epic dance fail at her office party on "Seinfeld."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW)

JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS: (as Elaine) All right. Who's dancing? Come on, who's dancing? Want me to get it started?

Read more
Author Interviews
8:29 am
Sun December 15, 2013

54 Days In The Eternal City: A Christian 'Pilgrimage' For Lent

Rome's St. Zeno chapel was built by Pope St. Paschal I in honor of his mother. The ceiling, a gold mosaic, was intended as an interpretation of heaven.
Stephen Weigel Courtesy of Basic Books

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

Each year, millions of people from different faiths make religious journeys. They travel far, to Mecca, Jerusalem, the Ganges River or Lourdes, France, to walk the paths of prophets, saints and martyrs.

"Pilgrimage is something built into the human condition," says George Weigel, author of Roman Pilgrimage: The Station Churches. "There seems to be something hardwired into us, spiritually, that the idea of a journey from A to B becomes part of the rhythm of the spiritual life."

Read more
Author Interviews
8:23 am
Sun December 15, 2013

New Princesses Rescue Girls From A Distressed Damselhood

Princess Vinnea and the Gulavores." href="/post/once-upon-time-princess-saved-environment" class="noexit lightbox">
Princess Vinnea, guardian of plant life (left), and Princess Terra, protector of the land, examine one of many "gulavores" plaguing the land of Hortensis in the children's book Princess Vinnea and the Gulavores.
Courtesy Setsu Shigematsu

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

The princess industry is lucrative: DVDs, dresses, crowns, theme parties. But the story of going to the ball and waiting for Prince Charming is outdated.

So one Southern California mom has created a new princess series with modern sensibilities. Creator Setsu Shigematsu recasts princesses as environmentally conscious and not waiting around to be rescued.

At the heart of her series, The Guardian Princess Alliance, is what animates any fairy tale: simple storytelling.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
8:23 am
Sun December 15, 2013

When Push Comes To Shove

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 3:04 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a five-letter word. You'll be given a clue for the word. Besides giving you a direct hint to the answer, the clue will also contain the answer in consecutive letters. For example, given "push over hard," you would say "shove."

Read more
Author Interviews
5:25 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Satan's Naked Women, Gatsby's Cocktails, And Other Literary Fetes

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 12:31 am

Throwing a perfect holiday party is no simple task. Do you want a swanky cocktail party, an intimate dinner party, or a huge New Year's bash? A whole host of decisions revolve around the menu — and don't forget your gluten-free or vegan invitees. Then there's the decor (is tinsel too much?), the music (festive, but not cheesy) and, of course, the guest list.

Read more
Music News
5:24 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Meet Latin America's Teenage Korean Pop Fanatics

The room of Samantha Alejandra, 18, in Mexico City, doubles as a shrine to her favorite K-Pop boy band, Super Junior.
Marlon Bishop for NPR

Originally published on Sun December 15, 2013 11:27 am

Read more
Around the Nation
5:23 am
Sun December 15, 2013

Oh My, Ohio! Five States Named 'Most Likely To Curse'

A rudeness ranking puts Ohio at the top of the list for "Most Likely To Curse," while South Carolina rates as the "Most Courteous" state.
Courtesy of Marchex

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 1:05 pm

Most of us like to think we comport ourselves with a certain level of civility. But apparently, phone calls with customer service representatives of all stripes can lead us into more colorful speech. And some people like to track it.

"There's just something about big data and sailor-cursing that complement each other — like peanut butter and mothereffing jelly," writes Megan Garber of The Atlantic.

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
8:03 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Noteworthy Names, In Rhyme

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 3:56 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person whose first and last names start with the same consonant or group of consonants. You're given rhymes for the two names. You name the people. For example, if given "cycle four," the answer would be "Michael Moore."

Last week's challenge: Name a dance. Change one of the letters to a U. The resulting letters can be rearranged to name an event at which this dance is done. What is it?

Answer: hula, luau

Read more
NPR Story
7:40 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Just How Unfair Is The U.S.'s World Cup Draw?

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

What's the best way to pick a sport's ultimate champion? Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the fickle nature of competitions, from the World Cup to the NFL playoffs to college football playoffs.

NPR Story
7:40 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Gordimer, Mazwai Remember Nelson Mandela

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
7:40 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Rick Warren Writes A Faith-Based Diet Book

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

While baptizing 827 adults one day, evangelical pastor Rick Warren says he literally felt the weight of America's obesity problem. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Warren and psychiatrist and physician Daniel Amen about getting healthy and their new book, The Daniel Plan: 40 Days to a Healthier Life.

Movie Interviews
5:34 am
Sun December 8, 2013

Woody Harrelson Does Bad Pretty Good

Tapping into his anger and rage, Woody Harrelson plays the meth-smoking psychopath antagonizing Christian Bale in Out of the Furnace.
Kerry Hayes Relativity Media

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 11:50 am

In the new drama Out of the Furnace, a young man (Casey Affleck) gets involved with a group of criminals and then goes missing. Determined to find him, his ex-con brother (Christian Bale) grabs a shotgun and sets off.

Actor Woody Harrelson, perhaps best known for his role as the bartender on Cheers, steps away from comedy to play a member of that group of criminals, a viscous meth addict and bookie named Harlan DeGroat.

Harrelson spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin about the movie and preparing for a role that required letting loose a lot of anger.

Read more
NPR Story
1:10 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

Commuter Train Derails In The Bronx

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

An early morning commuter train derailed in New York City on Sunday, killing at least four people and injuring 63. Five cars went off the track as the train took a large curve in the Bronx burough of the city. Host Rachel Martin gets the latest from NPR's Jim Zarroli.

NPR Story
12:16 pm
Sun December 1, 2013

N.Y. Train Derailment Kills 4

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

An early morning commuter train derailed in New York City on Sunday, killing at least four people and injuring 63. Five cars went off the track as the train took a large curve in the Bronx burough of the city. Host Rachel Martin speaks with Joe Stepansky of the New York Daily News, who's at the scene.

Middle East
8:17 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Palestinian Refugees On Losing Side Of UN Budget Crunch

Palestinian refugee Lawahez Burghal stuffs tripe with rice and garbanzo beans for her family in their home in the Amari refugee camp in the West Bank. Many refugees still depend on the United Nations for food, health care and education.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun December 8, 2013 8:17 am

The United Nations agency that provides basic health care and education to Palestinian refugees doesn't have enough money to pay local salaries this month.

The shortfall could directly affect 30,000 teachers, doctors and social workers, as well as the people using their services in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the Palestinian territories.

Filling Basic Needs

Sit for an hour in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency office in the al-Amari camp for Palestinian refugees, and you get a sense of what people expect the agency to provide.

Read more
Movie Interviews
8:17 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Refashioning A Gospel Story In 'Black Nativity'

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In 1961, at the height of the civil rights movement, Langston Hughes wrote the musical play "Black Nativity." It featured an entirely black cast, and it was the first play to incorporate a real gospel choir.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

CHOIR: (Singing) I'm coming home for you, you think (unintelligible).

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
8:17 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Be THANKful For This Puzzle

NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 3:49 pm

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is a game of categories based on the word "thank," in honor of Thanksgiving weekend. For each category, name something beginning with each of the letters T, H, A, N and K. For example, if the category were "U.S. States," you might say Tennessee, Hawaii, Alaska, Nevada and Kentucky.

Last week's challenge: Name a tree whose letters can be rearranged to spell two herbs or spices. Hint: The tree has a two-word name. What tree is it, and what are the herbs or spices?

Read more
Parallels
5:24 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Five Things You May Not Know About Child Marriage

Arinafe Makwiti, 13, says her parents forced her to drop out of school and get married to an older man last year to help with the family finances. Makwiti has divorced her husband, but now has a 9-month-old daughter.
Jennifer Ludden NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 10:40 am

NPR's Jennifer Ludden recently traveled to the African nation of Malawi, one of many countries in the developing world where child marriage remains prevalent. She found girls like Christina Asima, who was married at 12 and became a mother at 13. She is now divorced and caring for her infant son on her own. You can read Jennifer's full report here. Below are a few more things she learned while reporting on child marriage.

Read more

Pages