Weekend Edition Sunday

Sundays at 8AM

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Cornish on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

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Art & Design
9:06 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Destroyed By Rockefellers, Mural Trespassed On Political Vision

After the Rockefeller Center mural was destroyed in 1934, Diego Rivera recreated this version, named Man, Controller of the Universe, which is on display at the Palacio de Bellas Artes in Mexico City. The story of the original mural's creation and destruction is the focus of a Mexican Cultural Institute exhibition in Washington, D.C.
Courtesy of Museo Frida Kahlo

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

When Mexican artist Diego Rivera was commissioned in 1932 to do a mural in the middle of Manhattan's Rockefeller Center, some might have wondered whether industrialist tycoon John D. Rockefeller Jr. knew what he was getting into.

In 1934, the legendary artist's work was chiseled off the wall.

Now, in Washington, D.C., the Mexican Cultural Institute has mounted a show that tells what happened to Rivera's mural.

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Music News
8:40 am
Sun March 9, 2014

After A Bitter Struggle, DSO Brings 'Joy' To The People Again

Like many regional orchestras, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra has struggled financially. But after a lot of work, it's set itself on solid footing and become a bright spot in a struggling city.
Courtesy DSO

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:55 am

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Sports
8:19 am
Sun March 9, 2014

The Rebound, The Intersection Of Self-Containing Half Spaces

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

Did you miss the MIT conference on sports analytics? Slate's Mike Pesca tells NPR's Rachel Martin about the new tracking technology used in basketball, which puts rebounding in whole new light.

Race
8:19 am
Sun March 9, 2014

Busting Stereotypes To Become A Prima Ballerina

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

Transcript

MISTY COPELAND: I'm Misty Copeland and I'm a soloist with American Ballet Theater.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And how many years have you been dancing, Misty?

COPELAND: I have now been dancing for I think it's about 17 or 18 years but professionally for 13.

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Music News
8:19 am
Sun March 9, 2014

John Denver's 'Country Roads,' Now Official In West Virginia

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TAKE ME HOME, COUNTRY ROADS")

JOHN DENVER: (Singing) Almost heaven, West Virginia, Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Movie Interviews
7:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

'These Birds Walk': The Story Of Pakistan's Runaway Children

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 11:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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History
7:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Carnaval In Recife: Long History, Interesting Future

Originally published on Sun March 2, 2014 11:30 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. It's Carnaval in Brazil - that time of the year when people take to the streets and celebrate before the austerity of Lent begins. And while you may think the Rio de Janeiro when you think of Carnaval, we're going to take you north to Recife. It's considered one of the most diverse carnivals in Brazil. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Recife.

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Music News
7:20 am
Sun March 2, 2014

ABBA's 1970s Costumes Decidedly Worth The Tax Break

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 10:34 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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Movie Reviews
12:08 pm
Sun February 23, 2014

A 'Tale' That's A Labor Of Love, But Not A Complete Success

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Book fans can be pretty picky about how Hollywood treats their favorite reads. And Hollywood can sometimes disappoint. Marc Helprin's "Winter's Tale" has been a favorite of readers since it was published in 1983. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has a review of how well it works as a movie.

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The Sunday Conversation
10:18 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Fed Up With Harassment, Author Reveals Her Cyberstalker

Author Melissa Anelli has to let the FBI know whenever she travels abroad, so that law enforcement in other countries is alerted to the possibility her stalker might show up.
Jordan Edwards

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 10:45 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Melissa Anelli is the author of Harry, A History, a best-selling book about Harry Potter from J.K. Rowling's famous series. And for more than five years, she has also been the victim of a cyberstalker.

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Law
9:49 am
Sun February 23, 2014

N.Y. Becomes Largest Prison System To Curb Solitary Confinement

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:57 am

New York made sweeping changes this week to the way prisons use solitary confinement.

The deal, signed by a federal judge on Wednesday, was prompted by a federal lawsuit filed by critics who say thousands of inmates — some of them pregnant or mentally ill — are being held for months and even years in isolation, often for minor infractions.

Years Spent In Solitary

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Music Interviews
9:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Megaband Formed On Craigslist Becomes The Family Crest

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 4:12 pm

There are big bands and then there are really big bands, like The Family Crest, which features around 300 players. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with lead vocalist Liam McCormick about the band.

Sunday Puzzle
9:29 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Famous Four-By-Fours That Aren't Trucks

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:57 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a famous person with four letters in his or her first name and four letters in the last. For each person, you'll be given initials and an anagram of the full name. You name the person.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous entertainer: two words, four letters in each word. You can rearrange these eight letters to spell the acronym of a well-known national organization, and the word that the first letter of this acronym stands for. Who's the entertainer, and what's the organization?

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Sports
8:04 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Suitgate And Extreme Sports: An Olympic Wrapup

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 11:57 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It's almost over. The Winter Olympics are winding down today in Sochi, Russia. For the last three weeks, our reporters have been on the ground there, taking in all the glory, all the thrills, and sending those stories back to us here at home. But before they leave Sochi, we have gathered Team NPR together once more to recap some of the highlights of their experience. Robert Smith, Tamara Keith, Sonari Glinton - welcome to the show, you guys.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Thank you.

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Business
9:09 am
Sun February 16, 2014

The Green Rush Begins: Investors Get In On Pot's Ground Floor

Marijuana is sold for recreational use in Denver. Legalization of pot has set off a "green rush" to invest among venture capitalists.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

In the past, you could go to jail for selling marijuana. Now, depending upon where you live, you could end up going to the bank.

Medical marijuana is now legal in 20 states, and legislation is pending in 13 others. It's become a $1.5-billion-a-year industry, and it's expected to triple in just a few years. With legal cannabis one of the world's fastest growing market sectors, investors are seeing green.

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Africa
8:56 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Reversal Of Fortune In CAR Has Muslims Fleeing For Their Lives

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The Central African Republic is a country in chaos. Muslim rebels seized power last year and then lost it as Christian militias have fought back. And the war rages on. France and other countries have sent peacekeeping troops to the CAR. And today, Muslims are being evacuated under the protection of those international troops.

NPR's Gregory Warner is in the Central African Republic. He joins us now on the line. Greg, where are you and what are you seeing?

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Law
8:39 am
Sun February 16, 2014

It's Proven To Save Lives, So Why Is Maine Opposed To Narcan?

Naloxone hydrochloride, also known as Narcan, is an overdose antidote that many states have made available to first-responders.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

Dr. Lynn Ouellette, a psychiatrist from Brunswick, Maine, asks herself "What if?" a lot these days. What if they had found her son just a few minutes earlier? What if they had gotten him to the hospital sooner?

What if they'd had the overdose antidote Narcan in the house?

"What we know is that this saves lives and it gives addicts another chance," she says.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:15 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Get Ready To Flip Your Lid

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 16, 2014 11:44 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is called "One, Two, Three — Flip!" The answer will come in the form of two words, and for each word you'll get a clue beforehand. Reverse the order of the first three letters of the first word to get the second word. Example: Cavalry sword and more villainous = SABER, BASER.

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Music Interviews
8:10 am
Sun February 16, 2014

Rachel Ries' Album Reflects Her Urban-Rural Split

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 4:13 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The lilting voice of Rachel Ries comes to us courtesy of many different landscapes: the wide open spaces of South Dakota, the equatorial humidity of Africa, the bucolic green of Vermont and the managed urban chaos that is Brooklyn.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL RIES: (Singing) Time, I forgiven you, time. You were songs in my head, so I threw you over my little shoulder and you land, you landed on the floor...

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The Sunday Conversation
12:10 pm
Sun February 9, 2014

Addict Lives With 'Monster' That's Waiting To Pounce

Ruben Casteneda
Ruben Casteneda

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 12:45 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

This Sunday Conversation with Ruben Castaneda was inspired by WAMU's five-part series, "Crack: The Drug that Consumed the Nation's Capital."

When Ruben Castaneda first moved to Washington, he lived his life along two separate tracks.

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Energy
11:32 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Oil, Gas Drilling Seems To Make The Earth Slip And Go Boom

Infrastructure used for oil and gas may be making more earthquakes. In Texas, there 10 times the number of earthquakes now than a few years ago.
Mark Rogers AP

Originally published on Mon February 10, 2014 5:21 pm

There's been a surge in earthquakes in the U.S. over the last few years. In Texas, there are 10 times the number of earthquakes now than just a few years ago.

Scientists say it's likely linked to the boom in oil and gas activity, meaning that people who never felt the ground shake are starting to.

Here's how Pat Jones of Snyder, Texas, describes the earthquake that struck her town in 2010: "It just sounded like some car hit the back of our house. We got up and checked around and we didn't see anything or hear anything else."

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The Edge
9:14 am
Sun February 9, 2014

U.S. Speedskaters Get A Little Help From Their Friends

From left: U.S. Speedskaters Kelly Gunther, Brittany Bowe, Heather Richardson and Sugar Todd are aiming for Olympic glory in Sochi, Russia.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:15 pm

Speedskating is the U.S.'s most successful winter Olympic Sport. In Sochi this year, great things are expected again.

The secret to their success includes talent, skill and hard work, but there's also a network of support that buoys the team.

Two-time gold medalist Shani Davis is looking to win a history-making third: He would be the first speedskater to win the same event in three different Olympics.

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History
8:00 am
Sun February 9, 2014

Collecting The Letters Of Wartime

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 11:44 am

Letters written in a time of war reflect almost universal longing and loss, no matter the century or the enemy. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Andrew Carroll, the director of the Center for American War Letters, about his personal collection of wartime correspondence from every American conflict, going back to 1776.

Music Interviews
8:00 am
Sun February 9, 2014

The Handy Ambassador To New Zealand's Music Scene

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 11:44 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

New Zealand is famous for a lot of different things: sheep, stunning vistas, even Hobbits. And one of the specific island's most notable musical exports is a guy named Neil Finn. He took to the stage in the 1980s with the chart-topping kiwi bands Split Ends and Crowded House. Neil Finn has also had a strong solo career. And his new album, "Dizzy Heights," comes out Tuesday.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NEIL FINN: (Singing) You must reveal your inter sorrow. Show what you're made of, don't know what you're afraid of...

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Author Interviews
8:00 am
Sun February 9, 2014

A Vietnamese Pioneer, Modeled On An American Legend

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 11:44 am

Pioneer Girl is the story of a young woman whose brother has disappeared. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Bich Minh Nguyen about the novel, and its connection to the writer Laura Ingalls Wilder.

The Salt
11:49 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Sap Discovery Could Turn Syrup-Making Upside Down

Buckets collect sap on maple trees in Vermont. A new discovery means that sap doesn't have to be collected from mature trees out in the wild.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 12:51 pm

Last year researchers at the University of Vermont announced something that could change the way we think about Vermont — or at least how it produces its famous maple syrup.

The time-honored method calls for inserting a tap near the bottom of a tall, mature maple tree. At the end of February, the tree thaws, and voila: Sap starts flowing out the spigot at the bottom.

But in 2010, these researchers were testing ways to gather sap from mature trees when they noticed something unusual.

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All Tech Considered
9:57 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Should Uber Be Responsible For Driver Recklessness?

The transportation app Uber matches ride-seekers with drivers. Drivers must keep checking their phones to catch customers, and critics say that may have dangerous consequences on the road. Is Uber responsible for the risk?
Lucy Nicholson Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue February 4, 2014 11:04 am

A man named Syed Muzaffar drove for Uber, the San Francisco-based company that makes money selling car rides. He lives in a suburb of San Francisco and on New Year's Eve, he says, he was in the city for the sole purpose of picking up partygoers who needed a ride.

His night ended early and tragically, around 8 p.m., when he turned a corner and hit a family in a crosswalk.

"The mother sustained facial fractures," says Police Sgt. Eric Mahoney, who is investigating the case. "The 4-year-old boy suffered abrasions on his face, and the 6-year-old girl was fatally injured."

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The Sunday Conversation
9:17 am
Sun February 2, 2014

There's 'More To Life Than Sports': Lineman On Leaving NFL

John Moffitt, #74, protects Seattle Quarterback Charlie Whitehurst in a 2011 game versus the Cincinnati Bengals.
Otto Greule Jr Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 9, 2014 4:35 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

John Moffitt started playing football when he was 8 years old, and made it all the way to the top of the game. He played offensive lineman for the Seattle Seahawks for two seasons, then got traded to another powerhouse team, the Denver Broncos.

Incidentally, those two teams are playing in Super Bowl XLVIII, but Moffitt won't be on the field; he quit midway through this season.

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Sunday Puzzle
8:00 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Drop The Zero And Get With The Hero

NPR

Originally published on Sun February 2, 2014 2:17 pm

On-air challenge: For each single letter given, recombine it with the letters in the word "ZERO" to spell a new word. For example, ZERO plus F would be "FROZE."

Last week's challenge: What word, containing two consecutive S's, becomes its own synonym if you drop those S's?

Answer: Blossom, bloom

Winner: Trey Moody of Killeen, Texas

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Music Interviews
7:53 am
Sun February 2, 2014

Music For Folks Who've Been Through A Few Things

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 11:57 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Shelby Earl always loved music, and straight out of college in Seattle, she went to work in the music industry. She worked as a booking agent, then at a record label, an eventually at Amazon's music department.

SHELBY EARL: So, all of those little blurbs you see all over the music page on Amazon - those are written by people. And I was one such person.

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