T.E.D. Radio Hour

Sunday 10AM

A journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, and new ways to think and create. Based on riveting TEDTalks from the world's most remarkable minds.

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TED Radio Hour
10:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Are The Dangers Of A Single Story?

Novelist Chimamanda Adichie at the TEDGlobal conference in 2009.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 1:25 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Chimamanda Adichie's TEDTalk

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

About Chimamanda Adichie

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TED Radio Hour
10:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Are The Clues To A Good Story?

Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton shares what he knows about storytelling — starting at the end and working back to the beginning. Earlier this episode, Stanton shared a story that does exactly that.

About Andrew Stanton

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TED Radio Hour
10:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Makes A Good Story?

Filmmaker Andrew Stanton on the TED stage in 2012.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 1:45 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Andrew Stanton's TEDTalk

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

What Predictions From 1984 Came True?

Nicholas Negroponte at an early TED conference in 1984.
Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nicholas Negroponte's TEDTalk

Back in 1984, technology leader Nicholas Negroponte was able to predict, with surprising accuracy, e-readers, face to face teleconferencing and the touchscreen interface of the iPhone.

About Nicholas Negroponte

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Will GPS Change Our Standards for Privacy?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Todd Humphreys' TEDTalk

Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions — or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.

About Todd Humphreys

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

When Will Driverless Cars Be A Part Of Our Everyday Lives?

"I'm really looking forward to a time when generations after us look back at us and say how ridiculous it was that humans were driving cars" — Sebastian Thrun
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:52 am

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Sebastian Thrun's TEDTalk

Researcher Sebastian Thrun helped build Google's amazing driverless car, which he says will not only revolutionize how we get around, but also save lives.

About Sebastian Thrun

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TED Radio Hour
10:01 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Can Hacking The Stratosphere Solve Climate Change?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:43 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Hackers.

About David Keith's TEDTalk

Environmental scientist David Keith proposes a cheap and shocking way to address climate change: What if we inject a huge cloud of sulfur into the atmosphere to deflect sunlight and heat?

About David Keith

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

What's It Take To Become A Polar Explorer?

frogdesignmind

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Ben Saunders' TEDTalk

Explorer Ben Saunders wants you to go outside. Not because it's always pleasant and happy, but because that's where the meat of life is, "the juice that we can suck out of our hours and days." In 2004, Saunders skied solo to the North Pole. Saunders' next outdoor excursion? To try to be the first in the world to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Are Earth's Deepest Caves The Last Frontier?

Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Bill Stone's TEDTalk

Bill Stone is a maverick cave explorer who has plumbed Earth's deepest abysses. In this talk, he explains what it's like to descend into the deepest caves in complete darkness for days on end — and why he keeps doing it.

About Bill Stone

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TED Radio Hour
9:42 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Why Row Across The Oceans?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 1:39 pm

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode To The Edge.

About Roz Savage's TEDTalk

Roz Savage hated her high-powered London job. So she made the obvious next move: She quit to become an ocean rower. Now she's crossed the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans — solo.

About Roz Savage

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TED Radio Hour
9:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing?

Work doesn't happen at the office, says Jason Fried.
TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jason Fried's TEDTalk

Software entrepreneur Jason Fried has a radical theory of working: that the office isn't a good place to do it. In his talk, he lays out the main problems and offers suggestions to make work work.

About Jason Fried

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TED Radio Hour
9:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Can You Code A Better Government?

Jennifer Pahlka speaking about Code for America at the TED conference.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:06 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Jennifer Pahlka's TEDTalk

Can government be run like the Internet, permissionless and open? Coder and activist Jennifer Pahlka believes it can — and that apps, built quickly and cheaply, are a powerful new way to connect citizens to their governments — and their neighbors.

About Jennifer Pahlka

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TED Radio Hour
9:55 am
Fri May 17, 2013

How Can You Give A Community Better Health?

Ron Finley, renegade gardener, says food is both the problem and the solution.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 9:37 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Ron Finley's TEDTalk

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

About Ron Finley

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Podcasts

  • Friday, April 11, 2014 1:33am

    Stories ignite our imagination, let us leap over cultural walls and cross the barriers of time. Stories affirm who we are, and allow us to experience the similarities between ourselves and others, real or imagined. Stories help us make meaning of our lives. In this hour, TED speakers explore the art of storytelling — and how good stories have the power to transform our perceptions of the world. Novelist Tracy Chevalier explains how she discovers a compelling story from inside a painting. Graphic designer Chip Kidd creates “visual haikus” — book covers that, in a single image, tell the story inside. Writer Chimamanda Adichie warns that if we hear only a single story about another person, we risk a critical misunderstanding. Plus, filmmaker Andrew Stanton says good storytelling is starting at the end and working back to the beginning.

  • Friday, April 4, 2014 12:43am

    What does money tell us about human nature? How does it motivate, trick, satisfy and disappoint us? On this episode, TED speakers share insights into our relationship with money. Psychologist Laurie Santos studies human irrationality by observing how primates make decisions — including some not-so-savvy money choices their human relatives often make. Behavioral economist Keith Chen says languages that don’t have a future tense strongly correlate with higher savings. Social psychologist Paul Piff describes how almost anyone’s behavior can change when they’re made to feel rich. Career analyst and writer Daniel Pink explains why traditional rewards like money aren't always successful motivators. Social scientist Michael Norton researches how money can buy happiness — the key is social spending that benefits not just you, but other people.

  • Friday, March 28, 2014 1:13am

    There are some truths that we believe in wholeheartedly — but what if we’re completely wrong? Once we separate fact from fiction, how do our perceptions change?  In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true. Author Malcolm Gladwell reveals an alternative account of David and Goliath that flips the story on its head. Reporter Leslie T. Chang debunks how we assume Chinese factory workers feel. Ecologist Allan Savory counters everything conventional wisdom tells us about how grasslands lose their life to desertification. Reporter Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the actual origins of Chinese-American food. Psychologist Barry Schwartz says having more options doesn't make us happier — it actually paralyzes us.

  • Friday, March 21, 2014 12:53am

    Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful. Life coach Tony Robbins describes why failure should not be an option. Psychologist Angela Lee Duckworth says "grit", not IQ, is the new predictor of success. Mike Rowe encourages us not to follow our passion. Ron Gutman shares some compelling research on the hidden power of smiling. And writer Alain de Botton shares a fascinating view about the American paradigm for success and failure.

  • Friday, March 14, 2014 12:43am

    There are problems affecting big parts of our lives that seem intractable. From politics, to health care, to law and the justice system — some things just don’t seem to work as they should. In this hour, TED speakers share some big ideas on how to solve the seemingly impossible. Attorney Philip K. Howard argues the U.S. has become a legal minefield and we need to simplify our laws. Legal scholar Lawrence Lessig says corruption is at the heart of American politics and issues a bipartisan call for change. Health advocate Rebecca Onie describes how our health care system can be restructured to not just treat — but prevent — illness. Lawyer Bryan Stevenson explains how America’s criminal justice system works against the poor and people of color, and how we can address it.