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Parallels
3:04 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

2,000 Buses Of Visitors: Rome Braces For Canonization Crowds

Tourists walk past a poster of Pope John Paul II on April 13 in Rome.
Gregorio Brogia AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:20 pm

The day after Easter, St. Peter's Square was packed.

Caramba Camarra, a Gambian volunteer with Opera Romana Pelligrinaggi, the Vatican-run pilgrimage agency, said he had never seen so many people lined up to visit the basilica.

"It's amazing! The line curves like a serpent, filling the whole square," he said. "It looks like the crowds at Mecca."

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Music Reviews
2:44 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

For Jessica Lea Mayfield, Sometimes Sanity Is The Better Option

Jessica Lea Mayfield.
LeAnn Mueller Courtesy of the artist.

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NPR Story
2:44 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Seth Meyers' 'Late Night' Challenge: What To Do With His Hands

Seth Meyers hosts the premiere of his talk show, Late Night with Seth Meyers, in February. "The trickiest part of this job the first week was just figuring out what to do with my hands," says Meyers, who was used to holding a microphone during standup. Remembering that he had pockets was key.
Peter Kramer AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 4:32 pm

Seth Meyers already had his dream job. As the host of Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update, "I sort of had already accomplished the job I never thought I would accomplish," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. He joined the cast in 2001 and was there for 12 years.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

In Lawsuit, American Muslims Claim FBI Used No-Fly List To Bully Them

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:29 pm

Four American Muslims are suing the FBI alleging that the law enforcement agency bullied them using the no-fly list.

According to a lawsuit filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, the men claim they were put on the list after refusing to become agents for the FBI.

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NPR Story
2:22 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

South Korean Ferry Disaster: One Survivor's Story

More than 150 bodies have now been recovered from the wreck of a ferry that sank off the South Korean coast last week. There are nearly 150 people still missing.

BBC correspondent Lucy Williamson went to the holiday island of Jeju to meet a survivor.

Note: Please subscribe to the Here & Now podcast or use the WBUR mobile app to hear this BBC interview.

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NPR Story
2:22 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

May The Best Barista Win

Filling in as a judge, James Tooill critiques barista Michael Butterworth's coffee. (Gabe Bullard/WFPL)

Baristas from around the country will compete in the U.S. Coffee Championships in Seattle this week to see who rises to cream of the crop. Contests include best brewer’s cup and latte art.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Gabe Bullard of WFPL reports that Kentucky — which is better known for its bourbon than for coffee — is sending two baristas who are going for the gold.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Judge OKs WikiLeaker Manning's Name Change To 'Chelsea'

The soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning was dressed as a woman in this 2010 photograph.
U.S. Army handout Reuters/Landov

The ex-Army intelligence analyst responsible for the biggest leak of classified material in U.S. history is now officially known as Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.

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Parallels
1:34 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

China And Beyond: NPR's Frank Langfitt Answers Redditors' Questions

Frank Langfitt is NPR's international correspondent based in Shanghai.
Wright Bryan NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 5:49 pm

From his home base in Shanghai, Frank Langfitt keeps track of a wide swath of North and East Asia. He's recently back from Myanmar, where he went for (mostly) fun.

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The Two-Way
1:14 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

After Bitter Split, Palestinian Factions Pledge To Reconcile

Palestinians march Wednesday in Gaza City in support of an attempt to reconcile the two main factions. Those factions, Hamas and the Palestine Liberation Organization, have been bitterly divided since 2007. They hope to form a unity government within five weeks.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 5:16 pm

Seven years after a violent split, the two main Palestinian factions said Wednesday that they are attempting to reconcile and form a national unity government within five weeks.

The Palestine Liberation Organization and Hamas have tried several times to resolve their feud, but those efforts quickly unraveled.

So will this attempt fare any better?

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All Tech Considered
12:53 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Weekly Innovation: An Inflatable Car Seat That Comes In A Backpack

Volvo's inflatable car seat is a concept and not a marketable product right now.
Courtesy of Volvo

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 5:32 pm

Forget wearables, let's talk about inflatables.

Volvo's new child safety seat concept is a fully inflatable device designed to make what's normally a clunky and heavy seat both lighter and more portable.

So compact is this prototype that it goes from a stylish-looking backpack into a rear-facing car seat in less than a minute. You can pump it in the car — the seat comes with its own pump — and it's Bluetooth-connected so you could pump it remotely.

When inflated, the seat weighs just under 11 pounds.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:33 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Music That Burns, Literally

Veritasium/YouTube

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 4:28 pm

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Obama Assures Japan Of U.S. Security Commitment

President Obama and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe depart Sukiyabashi Jiro sushi restaurant in Tokyo, on Wednesday. Obama met with Abe on the first stop of a four-nation visit to Asia.
Carolyn Kaster AP

President Obama, at the start of a four-stop trip to Asia, sought to reassure Japan that the U.S. is on its side in a dispute with China over the tiny Senkaku islands chain, which has led to bluster and naval jockeying between the two countries in recent years.

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The Salt
12:23 pm
Wed April 23, 2014

Bake Bread Like A Pioneer In Appalachia ... With No Yeast

Salt rising bread is a yeastless Appalachian soul food.
Susan Brown and Jenny Bardwell

Growing up in West Virginia in the 1960s and '70s, Susan Brown would have a slice of salt rising bread, toasted, for Saturday morning breakfast. Her grandmother baked the bread with the mysterious and misleading name.

There's little or no salt in the recipe. No yeast, either. The bread rises because of bacteria in the potatoes or cornmeal and the flour that goes into the starter.

The taste is as distinctive as the recipe. Salt rising bread is dense and white, with a fine crumb and cheese-like flavor.

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It's All Politics
11:59 am
Wed April 23, 2014

A Path Out Of Prison For Low-Level, Nonviolent Drug Offenders

The new guidelines are part of the Obama administration's effort to address long mandatory minimum sentences. Antwain Black (left) was released early after sentencing laws were first eased in 2010.
Seth Perlman AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:44 pm

Thousands of nonviolent drug offenders serving time in federal prison could be eligible to apply for early release under new clemency guidelines announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Details of the initiative, which would give President Obama more options under which he could grant clemency to drug offenders serving long prison sentences, were announced by Deputy Attorney General James Cole.

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Wed April 23, 2014

American Journalist Kidnapped By Ukraine's Pro-Russia Insurgents

In a photo taken earlier this month, U.S. reporter Simon Ostrovsky stands with a pro-Russian gunman at a seized police station in the eastern Ukrainian town of Slovyansk. Ostrovsky has reportedly been seized by the pro-Russian insurgents.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:34 pm

An American journalist operating in eastern Ukraine has been kidnapped by pro-Russian gunmen, the separatists said Wednesday.

Simon Ostrovsky, working for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint early Tuesday by masked men in the restive eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.

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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Wed April 23, 2014

7 Weeks Before World Cup, Rio Is Rocked By Riot

An officer from Brazilian Police Special Forces took aim Tuesday during the violent protest that broke out in one of Rio de Janeiro's slums. People there blame police for a young man's death, and say authorities are clamping down too hard in advance of this June's World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Summer Olympics, both of which will be held in Brazil.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 12:12 pm

"A Rio de Janeiro slum erupted in violence late Tuesday following the killing of a popular local figure, with angry residents setting fires and showering homemade explosives and glass bottles onto a busy avenue in the city's main tourist zone," The Associated Press writes.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Joys Of Spoiling

Game of Thrones: spoiler magnet.
Courtesy of HBO

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 5:41 pm

In the age of the Internet, the act of spoiling is easier than ever before. Through live-tweeting and message boards and comments sections, the information is out there and spreads quickly.

But why do some people enjoy revealing certain information about stories — surprises and finales and more — before others have had the opportunity to experience it?

We could tell you what we think now. But that would spoil the rest of this story.

Spoliation Nation

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Government Will Try To Persuade Sherpas To Stay On Everest

The sun shines on the peak of Mount Everest in this October 2011 photo. On Friday, an avalanche swept away 16 Sherpas.
Kevin Frayer AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 11:17 am

The news from high up the world's tallest mountain continues to be confusing, with some reports implying that a boycott by Sherpas means there will be no climbs to the summit this year and others indicating that there will still be attempts to reach the top.

Based on what we can glean from various news accounts, it appears that some expeditions have indeed canceled their climbs. But it also seems that at least some of the estimated 400 Sherpas on the mountain may be willing to continue on — meaning there will be summit attempts in coming weeks.

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The Two-Way
9:04 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Death Toll Rises, Hopes Fade At Site Of Korean Ferry Disaster

As the sun set Wednesday in Jindo, South Korea, a woman kept watch on the waters where the Sewol ferry sank. It's feared the death toll will reach 300.
Nicolas Asfouri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 11:52 am

The already slim hope that anyone might still be alive aboard the South Korean ferry that sunk a week ago was all but extinguished Wednesday with the news that divers have found no air pockets in key areas of the ship.

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Shots - Health News
7:43 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Dirty Money: A Microbial Jungle Thrives In Your Wallet

Even some euro bank notes may need a good scrubbing. Like dollar bills, these notes are made from cotton and they harbor an array of bacteria.
Thomas Leuthard The Preiser Project/Flickr

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 2:44 pm

You may have heard that dollar bills harbor trace amounts of drugs.

But those greenbacks in your wallet are hiding far more than cocaine and the flu. They're teeming with life.

Each dollar bill carries about 3,000 types of bacteria on its surface, scientists have found. Most are harmless. But cash also has DNA from drug-resistant microbes. And your wad of dough may even have a smudge of anthrax and diphtheria.

In other words, your wallet is a portable petri dish.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Stowaway Teen May Have Been Trying To Reunite With His Mom

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 11:09 am

The latest word about the teenager who survived a ride Sunday from California to Hawaii in the frigid wheel well of a jet is that he may have hoped to eventually get to Somalia to be with his mother.

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U.S.
7:38 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Illinois, A Town That's Half-Destroyed But Filled With Hope

Washington, Ill., is full of both optimistic signs and lots of construction crews as the town rebuilds after a half-mile-wide tornado devastated the area in November.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:12 pm

Washington is just starting to rebuild.

Much of the central Illinois town was wiped away by a half-mile-wide tornado in November. In all, 1,108 homes were destroyed or rendered uninhabitable — a huge share of the housing stock in a city of 15,000.

"Early on, people were asking me how long it was going to take to rebuild the city, and I said we'll do it in a year," says Mayor Gary Manier. "That was wishful thinking."

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Around the Nation
7:10 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Florida School Offered Kids Caffeine On Test Day

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Some stores post a warning: Disobedient children will be given and a puppy and an espresso. Maybe that's not so bad. Kids at a Melbourne, Florida elementary school were given caffeine. Each kid was offered trail mix and Mountain Dew on the morning of standardized tests. A grandmother got the school to stop, but the principal says she read a study on keeping kids' energy levels stable. By the way, Creole Elementary is rated an A+ school. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
7:05 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Canadian Police Extricate Bear From Jar

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Winnie the Pooh is often found head-first in a jar of honey. For a bear in Canada, birdseed was too much to resist. Residents in Sudbury, Ontario spotted a bear stumbling down the street, unable to see where it was going, because a large jar of birdseed was stuck on its head. It even bumped into a police car. The cops, you will be happy to know, got experts there to sedate the bear and cut the jar off its head.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
6:57 am
Wed April 23, 2014

'Object Of Interest' Found In Search For Malaysian Jet

Ships continued to search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on Wednesday. They were looking in an area about 1,000 miles northwest of Perth. Ocean Shield is an Australian ship that has been looking for the jet's black boxes.
Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 12:24 pm

After 6 1/2 weeks of false leads and conflicting information about what may have happened to the jet and the 239 people on board, Wednesday's headlines about the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 need to be viewed with considerable caution:

-- " 'Object of interest' found on Western Australian coast." (CNN.com)

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Education
5:54 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Income Inequality Is A Major Barrier To Attending College

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 9:45 am

Morning Edition co-host David Greene talks to Suzanne Mettler of Cornell University, author of the new book, Degrees of Inequality: How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Haagen-Dazs Experiments With Veggie Ice Cream

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Our last word in business is: Veggie Ice Cream.

Japanese parents trying to get their kids to eat vegetables can skip to desert.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Haagen-Dazs is testing vegetable-flavored ice cream in Japan. Flavors include tomato cherry and carrot orange.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Affirmative Action Ban

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Steve Inskeep talks to Lee Bollinger, a former president at the University of Michigan, about Tuesday's ruling. Bollinger was president during two earlier landmark affirmative action cases.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die. The stroke patients also have fewer significant disabilities.

NPR Story
5:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Urban Libraries Become De Facto Homeless Shelters

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Whether they like it or not, libraries in some cities serve as homeless shelters. People come off the streets to find quiet and warmth. If libraries want to do something about this, they have some choices: They can put homeless visitors back out on the street. San Francisco libraries want to get them back on their feet.

Scott Shafer reports from member station KQED.

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